Truck art of the day
21 July, 2018

Truck art of the day

Truck art of the day. #handpainted #truckart #lettering #mumbai #trucklettering #Rakesh #mob

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Blurry truck lettering of the day
1 April, 2018

Blurry truck lettering of the day

Blurry truck lettering of the day. #decorativetype #handpaintedsigns #lettering #devanagari #mumbai #truckpainting

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Is it?
29 March, 2018

Is it?

Photo taken at: Mumbai, Maharastra

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SUNDAY CLOSED
24 April, 2017

SUNDAY CLOSED

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Nice 3D lettering at Shivaji Park
6 October, 2016

Nice 3D lettering on a Shivaji Park sign....

Nice 3D lettering on a Shivaji Park sign. The natural dust and dirt on it really defines and makes the letters pop.

Photo taken at: Shivaji Park

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A very unique water truck!
25 August, 2016

A very unique water truck!

Photo taken at: Shivaji Park

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Horn (NOT) OK Please
19 March, 2016

Unfortunately as you can see here, it’s no longer OK to Horn Please in Mumbai.

The words Horn Please or Horn OK Please are very common on every shape and size of truck throughout India. The origin of why this is so ubiquitous is a mystery, nevertheless, it has been around for decades and is a major feature in the look and personality of a truck. In 2014 two nice books on India’s painted trucks were published, both creatively titled “Horn Please”, one by Dan Eckstein and the other by Pawan Jain Divya Jain. I can recommend them incase you aren’t able to come see these trucks for yourselves before they are gone. Alternatevely, there’s even a new documentary on Indian Truck art also called Horn Please.

You are probably already aware that India has a rich history (and still common use) of hand painted signs and lettering and trucks in particular are often adorned with bright colors, fancy lettering, and all sorts of decorations. But sign painters all over the country are being put out of business by modernity – faster and cheaper printing, and to some extent, wanting a more simple/precise/Western look. Last year the Maharashtra state government made a move against the tradition of truck art by banning the phrase “Horn Please”. Their motivation for this new law stemmed on the fact that everyone honks all the time when driving, and they believe that painting this phrase on trucks encourages even more excess noise.

“It gives licence to motorists to honk unnecessarily and there have been numerous complaints of excessive honking in silence zones such as near hospitals, schools and colleges. We have, therefore, decided to impose a ban on the use of this phrase,” said a senior official from the transport commissioner’s office, adding that it will also help reduce noise pollution.

via Economic Times

This new mandate hasn’t entirely caught on yet, but as of 2016 more and more trucks around Mumbai are beginning to cover up their lettering. The quickest and cheapest way is to simply put tape over the words, but some are taking the extra step and crudely painting over it. Very rarely is anyone taking this opportunity to redesign and repaint the back of their truck… But hopefully when it comes times to paint or repaint these vehicles there will still be interest to apply some creativity and personalize them, and they won’t just leave an empty hole where Horn OK Please was once written. I optimistically predict more “don’t be horny” and “India is Great” paintings to start appearing soon in Maharashtra.

horn-not-ok-please-15

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Dadar Electric Institute
29 February, 2016

Dadar Electric Institute

Dadar Electric Institute

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Fresh paint.
14 October, 2015

Fresh paint.

Fresh paint.

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Kohei Sugiura: Graphic Design Methodology and Philosophy
9 September, 2015

Last night I had the fortune to attend the opening of a wonderful exhibition for the Japanese typographer Kohei Sugiura. The show was organized by Kimya’s former professor and mentor Kirti Trivedi – a friend and former student of Sugiura’s. The show is up for less than a week September 9-13th, so if you are in Mumbai, you really should hurry and pay it a visit.

During the opening, Kirti gave a touching presentation covering Suigura’s biography (and the opening was on his birthday!), portfolio highlights, and some of his fascinating philosophical ideas. His concepts and methodologies are inspiring in special ways – many are radically different from our conventional Western views. I believe there is much that we can learn from him and his thinking. Personally, I’m very excited to read more about him and his work, and he is making me want to visit Japan even more now!

I quite like the quote:

“Human beings stand on the ground and walk with two legs. One leg steps forward. To continuously move forward, to grow and develop, is what we all hope for. That is the role of the front leg.

However, we have two legs. There is the back leg as well. If the back leg is not planted firmly on the ground it won’t provide the strength the front leg needs to move forward. It is only when both legs move alternately, in a joint effort, that we are able to advance.

What is the back leg? What does it mean to step firmly on the ground? The ground, of course, is our heritage of history and civilization. By planting one leg on this vast accumulation of wisdom and knowledge, we enable our other leg to move forward.

Our two legs and their movement – the front leg advancing civilization, the back leg standing on history and tradition – teach us how to live in the present.

When we take another step, the front leg representing the advance of civilization switches roles and becomes the back leg, while the back leg representing history and tradition advances and becomes the front leg. The two legs take turns, and we walk. “Two legs, one movement”: again, we are reminded of the philosophy of “one in two, two in one”.

Osianama & Tao Art Gallery present
Kohei Sugiura:Graphic Design Methodology and Philosophy
An Exhibition on the work of the Master Designer from Japan
Books, Magazines, Posters, Calendars on Letterforms, Videos and Motion Graphics
9th–14th September 2015
11am to 7pm (daily)

Inauguration, 6:30 pm, Tuesday, 8 September 2015
Guided Tours of the Exhibition by Prof. Kirti Trivedi
9–13 September 2015, 4:00 – 6:00pm


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Misc Mumbai (3D) Signs Vol. 1
8 May, 2015

A few more random signs (in 3D this time) found in Mumbai. If you are more into painted 2D letters then check this out. Also, my Instagram account has lots more nice (mostly) Indian lettering.


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