Powązki Cemetery – Part 1
20 September, 2016

This is one of three connected cemeteries in the center of Warsaw. There is such a variety of styles and lettering techniques to be found here, it is a must see for any typophile. I have so many images from this cemetery that I’ve divided them into two posts. Be sure to also check out the Jewish cemetery and the Cmentarz Ewangelicko, they are also very interesting.

cmentarz-warsaw


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Warsaw Jewish Cemetery
16 September, 2016

This is one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in the world, and it’s beautiful. There are so many interesting letters and headstone designs here that it’s really worth a visit. It could take hours to properly walk through, so plan accordingly.

warsaw-jewish-cemetery-52

More about the cemetery at wikipedia.


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Warsaw Signs
12 July, 2014

Some interesting signs and type that I stumbled across on my first trip to Warsaw Poland.


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Warsaw’s Neon Muzeum
24 June, 2014

I recently visited Warsaw for two reasons: the TypoPolo exhibition, and this museum. And I have to say, the Neon Muzeum was totally worth the entire trip.

In many ways, this museum is similar to Berlin’s Buchstabenmuseum which also focuses on neon signs and lettering. And it’s difficult to explain, but this museum has a totally different feel. Only opened for a few years, this privately funded museum has managed to collect and preserve much of Warsaw, and Poland’s, rapidly disappearing neon signage.

I was lucky to meet and have a long chat & tour with co-founder David Hill. He shared many interesting stories and background to the museum and Poland’s neon culture. One particularly interesting story was the unfortunate, ironic side-effect that the museum has had in Poland. In recent years these antiquated signs have been taken down and simply thrown out as junk or sold for scrap metal. But in part thanks to the museum’s interest in these as artifacts, the scrap signs now have a newly perceived value – so often times instead of preserving the signs and/or donating them to a good cause like this museum, the owners would rather hawk the old letters on ebay.

The museum not only host events, parties, publishes books, preserves a dying art, and educates, but they are also working to bring fresh new neon into the world. Just days after I was in town, there was the grand unveiling of a new neon sign made for a bridge in the middle of Warsaw! There’s another attraction to add to your map of “Warsaw’s Neon Signs Walking Tour”.

I’ve posted tons of photos here… Honestly it was difficult to narrow the collection down to these few (this isn’t even half of what I shot). If you can make it to Warsaw you absolutely should go find the museum and give it an hour or two. There’s so much more to see, and photos can’t convey the same experience as standing up close to the glass, metal, and electricity.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★


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TypoPolo Exhibition
22 June, 2014

“TypoPolo” is a notion which describes an aesthetic phenomenon, namely, the amateur designs of advertisements, signboards or informative inscriptions made for small businesses and crafts, which came into being in the Polish public sphere of the 1990s.

TypoPolo @ the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw

I first heard of this special exhibition at Typo Berlin last month from the Hakabo talk. Not yet having been to Poland, it was the perfect excuse to finally go because of it’s concrete (and time-sensitive) typographic theme. The exhibition is still up for another week (I saw it on what was to be the last day, but then it was extended two weeks)(April 29 – June 29, 2014), so maybe you can hurry to Warsaw to catch it!

A few days later, I happened to meet a man in Brno, Czech while we were in a line to get a beer… I mentioned that I was just in Warsaw, and that I mainly went just to see this show (and the Neon Museum)… and that I really enjoyed it. He then introduced himself as Rene Wawrzkiewicz, the curator of TypoPolo! He was super excited to hear someone went all the way there just for the show :) He also apologized that there weren’t English translations of the text (due to the budget of course). But then shared the great news that TypoPolo will travel to Wrocław later this year, and they are planning a bi-lingual book to also be published. I’m very much looking forward to that!


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